• Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition
  • Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition

Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition

EduReads Rating4.5

Classical electromagnetic theory, together with classical and quantum mechanics, forms the core of present-day theoretical training for undergaduate and graduate physicist. A thorough grounding in these subjects is a requirement for more advanced and specialized training.

This, Classical Electrodynamics Third Edition, attempts to adress changes in emphasis and applications without any significant increase in size.

What is Classical Electrodynamics, Third Edition Book all about?

Typically the undergraduate program in electricity and magnetism involves two or, perhaps, three semesters beyond elementary physics, with the emphasis on the fundamental laws, laboratory verification and elaboration of their consequences, circuit analysis, simple wave phenomena, and radiation. The mathematical tools utilized include vector calculus, ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, Fourier series, and perhaps Fourier or Laplace transforms, partial differential equations, Legendre polynomials, and Bessel functions.

The first aim of this book is to present the basic subject matter as a coherent whole, with emphasis on the unity of electric and magnetic phenomena, both in their physical basis and in the mode of mathematical description. The second, concurrent aim is to develop and utilize a number of topics in mathematical physics which are useful in both electromagnetic theory and wave mechanics. These include Green’s theorems and Green’s functions, orthonormal expansions, spherical harmonics, cylindrical and spherical Bessel functions.

New and Updated Content

The most visible change is the use of SI units in the first 10 chapters. Gaussian units are retained in the later chapters, since such units seem more suited to relativity and relativistic electrodynamics than SI. As a reminder of the system of units being employed, the running head left-hand page carries “-SI” or “-G” depending on the chapter.

Because of the increasing use of personal computers to supplement analytical work or to attack problems not amenable to analytic solutions, some new sections on the principles of some numerical techniques for electrostatics and magnetostatics, as well as some elementary problems, have been included. The aim is to provide an understanding of such methods before blindly using canned software or even Mathematica or Maple.

Rearranged topics

Faraday’s law and quasistatic fields are now in Chapter 5 with magnetostatics, permitting a more logical discussion of energy and inductances. Another major change is the consolidation of the discussion of radiation by charge-current sources, in both elementary and exact multipole forms, in Chapter 9. All the applications to scattering difraction are in Chapter 10.

The principles of optical fibres and dielectric waveguides are discussed in two new sections in Chapter 8. In Chapter 13, the treatment of energy loss has been shortened. The discussion in Chapter 14 has been augmented by a detail section on the physics of wigglers and undulators for synchroton light sources, as a result of the increasing importance of synchrotron radiation as a research tool. There is new material in Chapter 16 on radiation reaction and models of classical charged particles.

There is, also, much more tweaking by small amounts throughout the book.

EduReads Final Word

This book is designed for a two-semester course in electromagnetic theory. This book is the outgrowth of a graduate course in electrodynamics and can be very useful for students interested in theoretical physics, experimental nuclear and high-energy physics.

Classical Electrodynamics, 3rd Edition is available at Amazon New (Hardcover, Paperback)Used,and for Rent.

Also, you can CHECK MORE DETAILS AND PRICING AT Barnes & Noble, AbeBooks, Alibris, eCampus, BiggerBooks, and Knetbooks for this book.

Content

Complete and Detailed Table of Contents

  • Introduction and Survey
    • I.1 – Maxwell Equations in Vacuum, Fields, and Sources
    • I.2 – Inverse Square Law, or the Mass of Photon
    • I.3 – Linear Superposition
    • I.4 – Maxwell Equations in Macroscopic Media
    • I.5 – Boundary Conditions at Interfaces Between Different Media
    • I.6 – Some Remarks on Idealizations in Electromagnetism
  1. Introduction to Electrostatics
    • 1.1 – Coulomb’s Law
    • 1.2 – Electric Field
    • 1.3 – Gauss’s Law
    • 1.4 – Differential Form of Gauss’s Law
    • 1.5 – Another Equation of Electrostatics and the Scalar Potential
    • 1.6 – Surface Distributions of Charges and Dipoles and Discontinuities in the Electric Field and Potential
    • 1.7 – Poisson and Laplace Equations
    • 1.8 – Green’s Theorem
    • 1.9 – Uniqueness of the Solution with Dirichlet or Neumann Boundary Conditions
    • 1.10 – Formal Solution of Electrostatic Boundary-Value Problem with Green Function
    • 1.11 – Electrostatic Potential Energy and Energy Density; Capacitance
    • 1.12 – Variational Approach to the Solution of the Laplace and Poisson Equations
    • 1.13 – Relaxation Method Two-Dimensional Electrostatic Problems
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  2. Boundary-Value Problems in Electrostatics: I
    • 2.1 – Method of Images
    • 2.2 – Point Charge in the Presence of a Grounded Conducting Sphere
    • 2.3 – Point Charge in the Presence of a Charged, Insulated, Conducting Sphere
    • 2.4 – Point Charge Near a Conducting Sphere at Fixed Potential
    • 2.5 – Conducting Sphere in a Uniform Electric Field by Method of Images
    • 2.6 – Green Function for the Sphere; General Solution for the Potential
    • 2.7 – Conducting Sphere with Hemispheres at Different Potentials
    • 2.8 – Orthogonal Functions and Expansions
    • 2.9 – Separation of Variables; Laplace Equation in Rectangular Coordinates
    • 2.10 – A Two-Dimensional Potential Problem, Summation of Fourier Series
    • 2.11 – Fields and Charge Densities in Two-Dimensional Corners and Along Edges
    • 2.12 – Introduction to Finite Element Analysis for Electrostatics
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  3. Boundary-Value Problems in Electrostatics: II
    • 3.1 – Laplace Equation in Spherical Coordinates
    • 3.2 – Legendre Equation and Legendre Polynomials
    • 3.3 – Boundary-Value Problems with Azimuthal Symmetry
    • 3.4 – Behavior of Fields in a Conical Hole or Near a Sharp Point
    • 3.5 – Associated Legendre Functions and the Spherical Harmonics
    • 3.6 – Addition Theorem for Spherical Harmonics
    • 3.7 – Laplace Equation in Cylindrical Coordinates; Bessel Functions
    • 3.8 – Boundary-Value Problems in Cylindrical Coordinates
    • 3.9 – Expansion of Green Functions in Spherical Coordinates
    • 3.10 – Solution of Potential Problems with the Spherical Green Function Expansion
    • 3.11 – Expansion of Green Functions in Cylindrical Coordinates
    • 3.12 – Eigenfunction Expansions for Green Functions
    • 3.13 – Mixed Boundary Conditions, Conducting Plane with a Circular Hole
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  4. Multipoles, Electrostatics of Macroscopic Media, Dielectrics
    • 4.1 – Multipole Expansion
    • 4.2 – Multipole Expansion of the Energy of a Charge Distribution in an External Field
    • 4.3 – Elementary Treatment of Electrostatics with Ponderable Media
    • 4.4 – Boundary-Value problems with Dielectrics
    • 4.5 – Molecular Polarizability and Electric Susceptibility
    • 4.6 – Models for Electric Polarizability
    • 4.7 – Electrostatic Energy in Dielectric Media
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  5. Magnetostatics, Faraday’s Law, Quasi-Static Fields
    • 5.1 – Introduction and Definitions
    • 5.2 – Biot and Savart Law
    • 5.3 – Differential Equations of Magnetostatics and Ampère’s Law
    • 5.4 – Vector Potential
    • 5.5 – Vector Potential and Magnetic Induction for a Circular Current Loop
    • 5.6 – Magnetic Fields of a Localized Current Distribution, Magnetic Moment
    • 5.7 – Force and Torque on and Energy of a Localized Current Distribution in an External Magnetic Induction
    • 5.8 – Macroscopic Equations, Boundary Conditions on B and H
    • 5.9 – Methods of Solving Boundary-Value Problems in Magnetostatics
    • 5.10 – Uniformly Magnetized Sphere
    • 5.11 – Magnetized Sphere in an External Field; Permanent Magnets
    • 5.12 – Magnetic Shielding, Spherical Shell of Permeable Material in a Uniform Field
    • 5.13 – Effect of a Circular Hole in a Perfectly Conducting Plane with an Asymptotically Uniform Tangential Magnetic Field on One Side
    • 5.14 – Numerical Methods for Two-Dimensional Magnetic Fields
    • 5.15 – Faraday’s Law of Induction
    • 5.16 – Energy in the Magnetic Field
    • 5.17 – Energy and Self- and Mutual Inductances
    • 5.18 – Quasi-Static Magnetic Fields in Conductors; Eddy Currents; Magnetic Diffusion
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  6. Maxwell Equations, Macroscopic Electromagnetism, Conservation Laws
    • 6.1 – Maxwell’s Displacement Current; Maxwell Equations
    • 6.2 – Vector and Scalar Potentials
    • 6.3 – Gauge Transformations, Lorenz Gauge, Coulomb Gauge
    • 6.4 – Green Functions for the Wave Equation
    • 6.5 – Retarded Solutions for the Fields: Jefimenko’s Generalizations of the Coulomb and Biot-Savart Laws; Heaviside-Feynman Expressions for Fields of Point Charge
    • 6.6 – Derivation of the Equations of Macroscopic Electromagnetism
    • 6.7 – Poynting’s Theorem and Conservation of Energy and Momentum for a System of Charged Particles and Electromagnetic Fields
    • 6.8 – Poynting’s Theorem in Linear Dissipative Media with Losses
    • 6.9 – Poynting’s Theorem for Harmonic Fileds; Field Definitions of Impedance and Admittance
    • 6.10 – Transformation Properties of Electromagnetic Fields and Sources Under Rotations, Spatial Reflections, and Time Reversal
    • 6.11 – On the Question of Magnetic Monopoles
    • 6.12 – Discussion of the Dirac Quantization Condition
    • 6.13 – Polarization Potentials (Hertz Vectors)
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  7. Plane Electromagnetic Waves and Wave Propagation
    • 7.1 – Plane Waves in a Nonconducting Medium
    • 7.2 – Linear and Circular Polarization; Stokes Parameters
    • 7.3 – Reflection and Refraction of Electromagnetic Waves at a Plane Interface Between Two Dielectrics
    • 7.4 – Polarization by Reflection, Total Internal Reflection; Goos-Hänchen Effect
    • 7.5 – Frequency Dispersion Characteristics of Dielectrics, Conductors and Plasmas
    • 7.6 – Simplified Model of Propagation in the Ionosphere and Magnetosphere
    • 7.7 – Magnetohydrodynamic Waves
    • 7.8 – Superposition of Waves in One Dimension; Group Velocity
    • 7.9 – Illustration of the Spreading of a Pulse As It Propagates in a Dispersive Medium
    • 7.10 – Causality in the Connection Between D and E; Kramers-Kronig Relations
    • 7.11 – Arrival of a Signal After Propagation Through a Dispersive Medium
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  8. Waveguides, Resonant Cavities, and Optical Fibers
    • 8.1 – Fields at the Surface of and Within a Conductor
    • 8.2 – Cylindrical Cavities and Waveguides
    • 8.3 – Waveguides
    • 8.4 – Modes in a Rectangular Waveguide
    • 8.5 – Energy Flow and Attenuation in Waveguides
    • 8.6 – Perturbation of Boundary Conditions
    • 8.7 – Resonant Cavities
    • 8.8 – Power Losses in a Cavity; Q of a Cavity
    • 8.9 – Earth and Ionosphere as a Resonant Cavity: Schumann Resonances
    • 8.10 – Multimode Proagation in Optical Fibers
    • 8.11 – Modes in Dielectric Waveguides
    • 8.12 – Expansion in Normal Modes; Fields Generated by a Localized Source in a Hollow Metallic Guide
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  9. Radiating Systems, Multipole Fields and Radiation
    • 9.1 – Fields and Radiation of a Localized Oscillating Source
    • 9.2 – Electric Dipole Fields and Radiation
    • 9.3 – Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Fields
    • 9.4 – Center-Fed Linear Antenna
    • 9.5 – Multipole Expansion for Localized Source or Aperture in Waveguide
    • 9.6 – Spherical Wave Solutions of the Scalar Wave Equation
    • 9.7 – Multipole Expansion of the Electromagnetic Fields
    • 9.8 – Properties of Multipole Fields, Energy and Angular Momentum of Multipole Radiation
    • 9.9 – Angular Distribution of Multipole Radiation
    • 9.10 – Sources of Multipole Radiation; Multipole Moments
    • 9.11 – Multipole Radiation in Atoms and Nuclei
    • 9.12 – Multipole Radiation from a Linear, Cebter-Fed Antenna
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  10. Scattering and Diffraction
    • 10.1 – Scattering and Long Wavelengths
    • 10.2 – Perturbation Theory of Scattering, Rayleigh’s Explanation of the Blue Sky, Scattering by Gases and Liquids, Attenuation in Optical Fibers
    • 10.3 – Spherical Wave Expansion of a Vector Plane Wave
    • 10.4 – Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by a Sphere
    • 10.5 – Scalar Diffraction Theory
    • 10.6 – Vector Equivalents of the Kirchhoff Integral
    • 10.7 – Vectorial Diffraction Theory
    • 10.8 – Babinet’s Principle of Complementary Screens
    • 10.9 – Diffraction by a Circular Aperture; Remarks on Small Apertures
    • 10.10 – Scattering in the Short-Wavelength Limit
    • 10.11 – Optical Theorem and Related Matters
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  11. Special Theory of Relativity
    • 11.1 – The Situation Before 1900, Einstein’s Two Postulates
    • 11.2 – Some Recent Experiments
    • 11.3 – Lorentz Transformations and Basic Kinematic Results of Special Relativity
    • 11.4 – Addition of Velocities; 4-Velocity
    • 11.5 – Relativistic Momentum and Energy of a Particle
    • 11.6 – Mathematical Properties of the Space-Time of Special Relativity
    • 11.7 – Matrix Representation of Lorentz Transformations, Infinitesimal Generators
    • 11.8 – Thomas Precession
    • 11.9 – Invariance of Electric Charge, Covariance of Electrodynamics
    • 11.10 – Transformation of Electromagnetic fields
    • 11.11 – Relativistic Equation of Motion for Spin in Uniform or Slowly Varying External Fields
    • 11.12 – Note on Notation and Units in Relativistic Kinematics
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  12. Dynamics of Relativistic Particles and Electromagnetic Fields
    • 12.1 – Lagrangian and Hamiltonian for a Relativistic Charged Particle in External Electromagnetic Fields
    • 12.2 – Motion in a Uniform, Static Magnetic Field
    • 12.3 – Motion in Combined, Uniform, Static Electric and Magnetic Fields
    • 12.4 – Particle Drifts in Nonuniform, Static Magnetic Fields
    • 12.5 – Adiabatic Invariance of Flux Through Orbit of Particle
    • 12.6 – Lowest Order Relativistic Corrections to the Lagrangian for Interacting Charged Particles: The Darwin Lagrangian
    • 12.7 – Lagrangian for the Electromagnetic Field
    • 12.8 – Proca Lagrangian; Photon Mass Effects
    • 12.9 – Effective “Photon” Mass in Superconductivity; London Penetration Depth
    • 12.10 – Canonical and Symmetric Stress Tensors; Conservation Laws
    • 12.11 – Solution of the Wave Equation in Covariant Form; Invariant Green Functions
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  13. Collisions, Energy Loss, and Scattering of Charged Particles, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation
    • 13.1 – Energy Transfer in Coulomb Collision Between Heavy Incident Particle and Free Electron; Energy Loss in Hard Collisions
    • 13.2 – Energy Loss from Soft Collisions; Total Energy Loss
    • 13.3 – Density Effect in Collisional Energy Loss
    • 13.4 – Cherenkov Radiation
    • 13.5 – Elastic Scattering of Fast Charged Particles by Atoms
    • 13.6 – Mean Square Angle of Scattering; Angular Distribution of Multiple Scattering
    • 13.7 – Transition Radiation
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  14. Radiation by Moving Charges
    • 14.1 – Liénard-Wiechert Potentials and Fields for a Point Charge
    • 14.2 – Total Power Radiated by an Accelerated Charge: Larmor’s Formula and Its Relativistic Generalization
    • 14.3 – Angular Distribution of Radiation Emitted by an Accelerated Charge
    • 14.4 – Radiation Emitted by a Charge in Arbitrary, Extremely Relativistic Motion
    • 14.5 – Distribution in Frequency and Angle of Energy Radiated by Accelerated Charges: Basic Results
    • 14.6 – Frequency Spectrum of Radiation Emitted by a Relativistic Charged Particle in Instantaneously Circular Motion
    • 14.7 – Undulators and Wigglers for Synchrotron Light Sources
    • 14.8 – Thomson Scattering of Radiation
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  15. Bremsstrahlung, Method of Virtual Quanta, Radiative Beta Processes
    • 15.1 – Radiation Emitted During Collisions
    • 15.2 – Bremsstrahlung in Coulomb Collisions
    • 15.3 – Screening Effects; Relativistic Radiative Energy Loss
    • 15.4 – Weizsäcker-Williams Method of Virtual Quanta
    • 15.5 – Bremsstrahlung as the Scattering of Virtual Quanta
    • 15.6 – Radiation Emitted During Beta Decay
    • 15.7 – Radiation Emitted During Orbital Electron Capture: Disappearance of Charge and Magnetic Moment
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  16. Radiation Damping, Classical Models of Charged Particles
    • 16.1 – Introductory Considerations
    • 16.2 – Radiative Reaction Force from Conservation of Energy
    • 16.3 – Abraham Lorentz Evaluation of the Self-Force
    • 16.4 – Relativistic Covariance; Stability and Poincaré Stresses
    • 16.5 – Covariant Definitions of Electromagnetic Energy and Momentum
    • 16.6 – Covariant Stable Charged Particle
    • 16.7 – Level Breadth and Level Shift of a Radiating Oscillator
    • 16.8 – Scattering and Absorption of Radiation by an Oscillator
    • References and Suggested Reading
    • Problems
  • Appendix on Units and Dimensions
    1. Units and Dimensions, Basic Units and Derived Units
    2. Electromagnetic Units and Equations
    3. Various Systems of Electromagnetic Units
    4. Conversion of Equations and Amounts Between SI Units and Gaussian Units

Book Details

Edition: 3
Author
John David Jackson
Pages: 832
ISBN-10: 047130932X (Hardcover); 0462309320 (Paperback)
ISBN-13: 978-0471309321 (Hardcover); 978-0462309323 (Paperback)
Release Date: August 10th, 1998.
Publisher: Wiley
Category: Engineering –> Electrical/Electronics; Science –> Physics –> Solid-State Physics

About John David Jackson, Author of  “Classical Electrodynamics”

John David Jackson

John David Jackson received his B. Sc. from the University of Western Ontario in 1946 and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1949. He taught at McGill University for seven years and at the University of Illinois for ten before coming to Berkeley in 1967. He has held a Guggenheim Fellowship (Princeton, 1956-57), a Ford Foundation Fellowship (CERN, 1963-64), and Visiting Research Fellowships at Cambridge (Clare Hall, 1970) and Oxford (Jesus College, 1988-89). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He is the author of a well known graduate text, Classical Electrodynamics (Wiley, 1962, 1975, 1998), as well Physics of Elementary Particles (Princeton Press, 1958) and Mathematics for Quantum Mechanics (W A Benjamin, 1962). He has contributed to numerous summer school lecture series, and for 17 years served as Editor of Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science. Service to the University of California includes Department Chair (1978-81), and Head of the Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (1982-84). He retired from teaching in 1993 and is presently a Participating Retiree in the Physics Division, LBNL.

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